Examples of Honor Code Statements

Examples of Generic Language for Course Syllabi

The Stanford University Fundamental Standard

The Stanford University Fundamental Standard is a part of this course. 


  • It is Stanford’s statement on student behavioral expectations articulated by Stanford’s first President David Starr Jordan in 1896.
  It is agreed to by every student who enrolls at Stanford.
The Fundamental Standard states:
    • Students at Stanford are expected to show both within and without the University such respect for order, morality, personal honor and the rights of others as is demanded of good citizens. Failure to do this will be sufficient cause for removal from the University.
  • Penalties for violation of the Fundamental Standard can be serious (e.g., suspension, and even expulsion).


So re-read the Fundamental Standard, understand it and abide by it.

The Stanford University Honor Code

The Stanford University Honor Code is a part of this course. 


It is Stanford’s statement on academic integrity first written by Stanford students in 1921. It articulates University expectations of students and faculty in establishing and maintaining the highest standards in academic work. It is agreed to by every student who enrolls and by every instructor who accepts appointment at Stanford.
The Honor Code states:

  1. The Honor Code is an undertaking of the students, individually and collectively:
    1. that they will not give or receive aid in examinations; that they will not give or receive unpermitted aid in class work, in the preparation of reports, or in any other work that is to be used by the instructor as the basis of grading;
    2. that they will do their share and take an active part in seeing to it that others as well as themselves uphold the spirit and letter of the Honor Code.
  2. The faculty on its part manifests its confidence in the honor of its students by refraining from proctoring examinations and from taking unusual and unreasonable precautions to prevent the forms of dishonesty mentioned above. The faculty will also avoid, as far as practicable, academic procedures that create temptations to violate the Honor Code.
  3. While the faculty alone has the right and obligation to set academic requirements, the students and faculty will work together to establish optimal conditions for honorable academic work.

Penalties for violation of the Honor Code can be serious (e.g., suspension, and even expulsion).


So re-read the Honor Code, understand it and abide by it.

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